Deploy your RShiny App on AWS Series - Lightsail

aws r rshiny Nov 24, 2019
 

If your head is spinning over which deployment scenario to choose for your RShiny app look no further! I have a whole series planned out for you on various deployment options and why you should choose each one.

Why should you use AWS Lightsail for RShiny Deployment?

Deployment scenarios are like snowflakes. No two are exactly alike! ;-) You need different level of power and control for different deployment scenarios. Here we are going to talk about RShiny deployments, but it applies to just about everything.

Lightsail is a relatively recent addition to the whole AWS deployment ecosystem.  It makes it much simpler and more streamlined to deploy a web application than some of their other, more powerful solutions.

Lightsail would be a good choice for deployment for you if:

  • You don't feel comfortable deploying web applications or configuring web servers (Apache, NGINX).
  • You are just fine with configuring webservers but you need something quick and easy.
  • You have a smallish...
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AWS Elastic Compute Clusters for Genomics

aws bioinformatics hpc Oct 30, 2019

Amazon Web Services (AWS) gives you the ability to build out all kinds of cool infrastructure. Databases, web servers, Kubernetes backed applications, Spark clusters, machine learning models, and even High Performance Computing Clusters with AWS ParallelCluster.

 

Not just clusters, but Elastic Clusters!

One of the cooler aspects of using a cloud provider like AWS is the ability to scale up and down based on requests or need. This is generally called Elastic, and applies to a whole lot of services. Storage, kubernetes, load balancers, and compute clusters. This is first of all just awesome, because writing up something to scale up or down based on demand would be a major pain, and can give the best of all worlds.

Example Genomic Analysis Computional Needs

Let's say you're running a genomics analysis. First, you run your alignment, which takes (for the sake of argument) 20 nodes. Then you do variant calling, which takes 5 compute nodes, haplotype...

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Kubernetes on AWS – Getting Started with EKS

aws docker kubernetes Jul 14, 2019

AWS Elastic Kubernetes Service (EKS) is a fully managed service AWS launched recently. Elastic services in AWS it means that the number of instances actually in use scales up or down based on the demand. This is first of all seriously cool, and second of all can cut down on costs. Fewer requests? Fewer nodes!

I'm just getting started with Kubernetes myself, and going through this walkthrough was a great learning exercise. 

I love deploying applications with docker swarm because it's fairly simple and I already know it, however, Swarm for AWS has some downsides. Firstly, it is not elastic, secondly, in order to get sticky sessions you need to add an additional service such as Traefik. With session affinity you can deploy RShiny and Python Dash applications with no other functionality besides the built in, and that's amazing!

I also personally think the moving towards Kubernetes over Swarm. It even comes installed on my mac version of Docker. Now is a great time to get...

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Launch Your First AWS EC2 Instance

aws Jul 05, 2019

I'm loving creating videos, and so here is a 3 part series on getting started with AWS and EC2 Instances. Once you understand launching an EC2 instance absolutely every other part of AWS is going to make so much more sense. Behind the scenes we are all always just spinning up servers, installing all the things, and getting our stuff done. As always AWS has excellent documentation and I really encourage you to check it out!

Learning about deployment is an excellent strategy for so many reasons. Probably number one there is not having to wait around for people like me to have their acts together. 

Not only that, there are just so many cool things that are possible with all the neat new deployment strategies and distributed computing libraries out there. It used to be that software engineers would need to put in a HUGE amount of time and effort in order to really optimize for speed.

These days the barrier to getting your application running fast is just so...

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Develop a Python Flask Application with Docker and Deploy to AWS – Part 1 Docker Beginnings

aws docker flask python Jan 11, 2019

Series  - Deploy a python flask app to AWS

I am currently taking the Udacity Machine Learning Engineer Nanodegree, and as a part of my project I wanted to deploy my dockerized machine learning model, along with a (very) simple front end interface, to AWS. I needed to review some materials, and realized I was having a lot of trouble finding a single resource that went from A-Z in all the various moving pieces. In this series I will go over:

  • Build a single docker container using Miniconda
  • Create a small python flask application
  • Serve our flask application with docker-compose
  • Deploy our application to AWS

The Sweet Promise of Victory

Have you ever had an idea completely crash and burn because you couldn't move it from your computer to the remote server, or the cloud, or because you updated your operating system and broke absolutely everything?

Me too! (I break operating systems frequently. It's a problem.) 

That is why I started developing, from start...

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Develop a Python Flask Application with Docker and Deploy to AWS – Part 2 Serve a Flask App with Docker

aws flask python Jan 11, 2019

Overview

In this portion of the series we will be:

  • Creating a simple flask app with a few RESTful methods
  • Testing out our RESTful methods using curl.
  • Future proofing our development environment for easy and stress free deployment.

Get the Code

Clone the github repo to see the full code.

Create a flask app

Flask is a python framework for creating web applications. It has all kinds of functionality, but here we will be using just a small portion to create a few RESTful web routes.

A Note about Directory Structures

I tend to sit down with a paper and colored pens and figure out how I want my application organized. Generally, each service is in its own directory, which is then in its own docker container. A service is a single application, such as our flask app, a database, a job queue, etc. For this particular example we only have one service, the flask app, but hopefully you can see how important it is to organize your applications.

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